How Effective is Viagra?

Monday 13 April 2020
Viagra
3 minute(s) read

Viagra is a highly effective treatment for erectile dysfunction.

As noted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Viagra's efficacy for erectile dysfunction has been tested in 21 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials.

Viagra's efficacy on erectile dysfunction

Viagra's efficacy for the treatment of ED has been extensively studied. In all 21 clinical trials, the drug demonstrated statistically significant improvement in ED symptoms compared to a placebo.

Across all studies, the effectiveness of the Viagra pill for ED increased with its dosage. Of patients taking a 100mg dose, 82 percent reported improved erections, compared to 74 percent of patients taking a 50mg dose, 63 percent of patients taking a 25mg dose and 24 percent of patients taking a placebo. [1]

In terms of erection maintenance specifically, the combined results of five fixed-dose, dose-response studies lasting more than one month also demonstrated Viagra's impressive efficacy.

Regardless of baseline function levels (measured on a scale of zero to five), patients who took Viagra had much higher function levels than those who took a placebo.

Generic Viagra was successfully able to treat ED in all patient subpopulations, regardless of race, age, baseline severity or the cause of their ED. That includes patients with a wide range of other medical conditions, ranging from spinal cord injury to coronary artery disease.

Even patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy (complete removal of the prostate gland and its surrounding tissues) saw a drastic improvement in erectile function.

Forty-three percent of such patients saw improved function when taking Viagra, compared to 15 percent of such patients taking a placebo.

Given that about 85 percent of post-radical prostatectomy patients report difficulties with erections, those results are highly compelling. [2]

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Is Viagra right for you?

It's clear that Viagra is an extremely effective treatment for men with erectile dysfunction. As with all types of medications, though, you need to consult your physician before you start taking Viagra.

Patients should not take Viagra if any of the following apply to you:

  • If you take nitrates (medications commonly prescribed to treat chest pain).
  • If you take guanylate cyclase stimulators (medications commonly prescribed to treat PAH).
  • Are allergic to sildenafil or any of Viagra's other ingredients.

Patients interested in taking a Viagra dosage should tell their doctor if they have or have had:

  • Heart problems such as a heart attack, irregular heartbeat, angina or heart failure
  • Heart surgery within the last six months
  • Pulmonary hypertension (high blood pressure in the lungs)
  • A stroke
  • Low blood pressure, or high blood pressure that is not controlled.
  • A deformed penis shape
  • An erection lasting more than four hours
  • Blood cell problems such as sickle cell anemia, multiple myeloma, or leukemia
  • Retinitis pigmentosa, a genetic eye disease
  • Severe vision loss, including the eye condition non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION)
  • Bleeding problems
  • Stomach ulcers
  • Liver problems
  • Kidney problems, or are currently having kidney dialysis
  • Any other medical condition(s) [3]

Also be sure to inform your doctor of any other medications you're taking, including prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications and herbal supplements. Note that Viagra is not intended for use by women. If you want to read more Viagra articles, you can visit the My Drug Center blog. 

If your doctor decides that Viagra is right for you, you can save money on your prescription by purchasing it from a reputable online pharmacy or pharmacy referral service like My Drug Center. 

The content in this article is intended for informational purposes only. This website does not provide medical advice. In all circumstances, you should always seek the advice of your physician and/or other qualified health professionals(s) for drug, medical condition, or treatment advice. The content provided on this website is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.