The History of Advair


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Advair (fluticasone/salmeterol) has been one of the most popular asthma medications since 2001 and has generated about $100 billion in sales since then. In fact, Advair is reported to be the 90th most famous drug brand.

But who makes Advair, when was it invented and how is it used today? Read on to find out everything you need to know about Advair.

Who Makes Advair?

Advair is manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline, more commonly known as GSK and sometimes referred to simply as Glaxo. As of July 12, 2019, GSK was the eighth largest pharmaceutical company in the world. 

GSK's history can be traced back to 1715 with the opening of an apothecary shop in London. That first company was eventually acquired by Glaxo Laboratories Ltd., the origin of the "Glaxo" in GlaxoSmithKline.

The "Smith" and "Kline" portion of GlaxoSmithKline began in 1830 with the opening of the Smith & Gilbert drug house in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In 1870, Mahlon Kline joined the company, resulting in its renaming as Smith, Kline & Co.

GSK began to expand globally during the late 19th and early 20th century. By 1900, one million of their popular Beecham's Pills were being produced each day.

After the discovery of insulin in 1921, two of GSK's legacy companies were some of the first in the U.K. to produce insulin for commercial use. Just two years later, one of those companies produced 95 percent of the U.K.'s insulin. GSK also became one of the country's largest producers of penicillin in the 1940s.

During the latter half of the 20th century, GSK created the first treatment for HIV, which was first approved in 1987.

Today, GSK's annual revenue is counted in the tens of billions. In 2018, the company's revenue totaled $30.82 billion.

In addition to Advair, GSK manufactures other popular drugs such as Avodart and Lamictal.

Advair's Debut

Advair was first launched in 1998, with its recognizable purple Diskus inhaler making its debut in 2001.

Advair comes in several different formats, namely Advair HFA and Advair Diskus. Advair HFA is approved for the treatment of asthma, while Advair Diskus is approved for the treatment of both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Shortly after its release, Advair became immensely popular. By 2003, GSK's earnings were up by 16 percent thanks to Advair.

Advair Today

According to YouGov, Advair is the 82nd most popular drug brand in America. As mentioned earlier, it's also the 90th most famous. In 2018, the drug generated $1.42 billion in U.S. sales. 

Like all prescription drugs, Advair comes with the risk of side effects both mild and severe. According to the official Advair website, common side effects include throat irritation, headache, hoarseness and voice changes. More serious side effects include pneumonia, a weakened immune system, osteoporosis, heart problems and eye problems.  

On Jan. 30, 2019, the FDA approved the first generic version of Advair. That had a significant impact on GSK's revenue, with brand-name Advair sales falling by $700 million from the fourth quarter of 2018 to the first quarter of 2019. 

For people with asthma and/or COPD, though, the release of generic Advair has been a welcome change, with prices of the generic drug being 70 percent less than its brand-name counterpart.

Customers can now purchase both brand-name and generic Advair from reputable online pharmacies for a reduced price.

Buy Advair HFA and Advair Diskus online now and have it shipped to your door.

 

 

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